Learn.GitHub – Branching and Merging

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The Year’s Top 10 Highest Paid CEOs – WSJ.com

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swimming to cambodia

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I liked a YouTube video: A clip from the fantastic swimming to cambodia…

First, Think Inside The Box | Psychology Today

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Taxes—Three Litmus Tests

From Time’s “The Republican Revolution,” by Michael Reynolds

On the Oct. 31 edition of 60 Minutes, Stockman [Reagan’s budget director, David Stockman] weighed in on this madness. “We’ve demonized taxes,” he said. “We’ve created almost the idea that they’re a metaphysical evil … It’s rank demagoguery. We should call it for what it is. If these [Republicans] were all put into a room on penalty of death to come up with how much they could cut, they couldn’t come up with $50 billion, when the problem is $1.3 trillion. So to stand before the public and rub raw this antitax sentiment, the Republican Party, as much as it pains me to say this, should be ashamed of themselves.”

Reynolds concludes…

I would suggest three litmus tests to gauge whether the Republicans are serious about deficits: 1) Are they prepared to stop with the tax cuts? Because the deficit will keep widening with more of them. 2) Are they prepared to cut middle-class entitlements? Because the only places to find real reductions in federal-government spending are in the large, popular programs like Medicare and Social Security. 3) Are they ready to take on the Pentagon? Because at $717 billion, defense spending — more than half of all discretionary spending — has to be trimmed.

These are not political statements. They are mathematical ones, and it is on understanding math, not politics, that the third Republican revolution now rests.

Richard St. John: “Success is a continuous journey”

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I favorited a YouTube video: http://www.ted.com In his typically candid style, Richard St. John reminds us that success is not a one-way street, but a constant journey. He uses the story of his business’ rise and fall to illustrate a valuable lesson — when we stop trying, we…